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Norse Peak Wilderness

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Area Management

The Norse Peak Wilderness is part of the 109 million acre National Wilderness Preservation System. This System of lands provides clean air, water, and habitat critical for rare and endangered plants and animals. In wilderness, you can enjoy challenging recreational activities like hiking, backpacking, climbing, kayaking, canoeing, rafting, horse packing, bird watching, stargazing, and extraordinary opportunities for solitude. You play an important role in helping to "secure for the American people of present and future generations the benefits of an enduring resource of wilderness" as called for by the Congress of the United States through the Wilderness Act of 1964. Please follow the requirements outlined below and use Leave No Trace techniques when visiting the Norse Peak Wilderness to ensure protection of this unique area.

General Wilderness Prohibitions

Motorized equipment and equipment used for mechanical transport is generally prohibited on all federal lands designated as wilderness. This includes the use of motor vehicles, motorboats, motorized equipment, bicycles, hang gliders, wagons, carts, portage wheels, and the landing of aircraft including helicopters, unless provided for in specific legislation.

In a few areas some exceptions allowing the use of motorized equipment or mechanical transport are described in the special regulations in effect for a specific area. Contact the Forest Service office or visit the websites listed for more specific information.

These general prohibitions have been implemented for all national forest wildernesses in order to implement the provisions of the Wilderness Act of 1964. The Wilderness Act requires management of human-caused impacts and protection of the area's wilderness character to insure that it is "unimpaired for the future use and enjoyment as wilderness." Use of the equipment listed as prohibited in wilderness is inconsistent with the provision in the Wilderness Act which mandates opportunities for solitude or primitive recreation and that wilderness is a place that is in contrast with areas where people and their works are dominant.

Wilderness-Specific Regulations

Wilderness managers often need to take action to limit the impacts caused by visitor activities in order to protect the natural conditions of wilderness as required by the Wilderness Act of 1964. Managers typically implement 'indirect' types of actions such as information and education measures before selecting more restrictive measures. When regulations are necessary, they are implemented with the specific intent of balancing the need to preserve the character of the wilderness while providing for the use and enjoyment of wilderness.

The following wilderness regulations are in effect for this area. Not all regulations are in effect for every wilderness. Contact the Forest Service office or visit the websites listed for more specific information about the regulations listed.

ALL VISITORS

ORDER NUMBER R6-2007-003 Weed Free Hay and Crop Products

1. Possessing, storing or transporting any part of a tree or other plant, as specified in the order. For the purpose of this order, it is prohibited to possess or store hay or crop products that are not state certified weed free, to include any hay, hay cubes, straw, grain or other crop or mulch product within all congressionally designated Wilderness and trailheads leading into congressionally designated Wilderness within the boundaries of the National Forest System of the Pacific Northwest Region in the States of Washington, Oregon, California and Idaho. [36 CFR 261.58(t)] This regulation does not apply to persons possessing or storing commercially processed feed (feed pellets or steamed, rolled grains) or to persons possessing state certified weed free hay or crop products packaged as bales, containers, or sacks, when also marked using official tags, twine or other identification as required by the product¿s State of origin, or in possession of the original and current State documents which certify the hay or crop products meet or exceed the North American Weed Management Association (NAWMA) or comparable certification standard. ORDER NUMBER 141 In order to protect the Wilderness character and resource within Washington State Cascade Mountain Range Wildernesses, listed in Exhibit A attached, the following acts pursuant to 36 CFR 261.50 (a) and (b), are prohibited within all Wildernesses located within the Gifford Pinchot, Wenatchee, Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie, and Okanogan National Forests, until further notice:

1. Entering or being in the Wilderness with a group consisting of a combination of persons and pack and saddle animals exceeding 12 in total number, 36 CFR 261.58(f).

. Caching, leaving, or storing equipment (including geocaches), personal property, or supplies unattended for more than 48 hours, 36 CFR 261.57(f).

3. Using or possessing any type of wagon, cart or other wheeled vehicle, 36 CFR 261.57(h).

4. Grazing any pack or saddle animals within 200 feet slope distance of the shoreline of any lake, 36 CFR 261.57(a,e).

5. Hitching, tethering, or hobbling any pack or saddle animals within 200 feet slope distance of the shoreline of any lake, 36 CFR 261.58(aa). ORDER NUMBER 93-001

1. Shortcutting a trail switchback, 36 CFR 261.55€.

2. Being in an area posted as being closed for restoration, Wilderness restoration, or rehabilitation. 36 CFR 261.53(b).

OVERNIGHT VISITORS

ORDER NUMBER 302 Norse Peak and Clearwater Wildernesses In order to protect the vegetation adjacent to lakes and trails, to reduce soil compaction and erosion in heavily used areas, and to enhance the primitive character and resource adjacent to or within these areas (further defined in Exhibit A & B attached) located within the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie and Wenatchee National Forests: (1) Norse Peak Wilderness, (2) Clearwater Wilderness, (3) NonWilderness lands falling within 100 feet of Goat Lake, Placer Lake, and Sheep Lake, and (4) NonWilderness lands north of Chinook Pass to the Norse Peak Wilderness boundary and within 100 feet of the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail, THE FOLLOWING ACTS, LISTED BELOW, ARE PROHIBITED pursuant to 36 CFR 261.50 (a), until further notice:

1. Camping within 100 feet slope distance from the shoreline of any lake and/or the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail EXCEPT at Echo Lake and Lost Lake within Norse Peak Wilderness. 36 CFR 261.58(e).

2. Building, maintaining, or using a campfire, except self-contained, carry-in devices such as stoves, within the Summit Lake Basin within Clearwater Wilderness, 36 CFR 261.52a. Violation of these prohibitions is punishable by a fine of not more than $5000.00 or imprisonment for not more than six (6) months or both. Title 16 USC Section 551. EXHIBIT A

CAMPING OFFSET RESTRICTIONS

1. Camping within 100 feet slope distance from the shoreline of the following non- Wilderness lakes: A. Goat Lake, on the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest: Sec. 7 T. 17N., R. 11 E., W.M. B. Placer Lake, on Snoqualmie National Forest, administered by the Wenatchee National Forest Sec. 6, T. 16N., R. 11E., W.M. C. Sheep Lake, on Snoqualmie National Forest, administered by the Wenatchee National Forest Sec. 12, T. 16 N., R. 10 E., W.M.

2. Camping within 100 feet slope distance from the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail at non-Wilderness locations between Chinook Pass and the Norse Peak Wilderness boundary, on Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and administered in part by the Wenatchee National Forest Sec. 1, 11, 12, 13, & 14, T. 16 N., R. 11 E., W.M. and Sec. 36, (S. 1/2) & 31, T. 17 N., R. 11 E., W.M.

CAMPING OFFSET EXCEPTIONS

3. Exceptions to 100 foot slope distance camping restriction within Norse Peak Wilderness at the following lakes A. Echo Lake: Sec. 16 & 21, T. 18 N., R. 11 E., W.M. B. Lost Lake: Sec. 18, T. 18 N., R. 11 E., W.M. AREA FIRE RESTRICTIONS

4. Building, maintaining, attending or using a campfire, except self contained, carry-in devices such as stoves within Summit Lake Basin within the Clearwater Wilderness: Sec. 17,18 19 & 20, T. 18 N., R. 8 E., W.M.

STOCK USERS

ORDER NUMBER 06-05-FO-06-01 Trails Closed to Pack and Saddle Stock This order is deemed necessary to protect trails on the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest from damage due to inappropriate types of use, to protect designated Wilderness from resource degradation, to provide for user safety, to protect sensitive areas from vegetation loss or damage and soil erosion, and to reduce conflicts between types of use. In order to meet these objectives, the following acts pursuant to 36 CFR 261.50 (a) and (b), are prohibited within the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest on forest development trails designated below (see attached definitions:)

1. Using a saddle, pack, or draft animal on trails listed in Exhibit 1. 36 CFR 261.55(c).

2. Using a llama or pack goat on trails listed in Exhibit 1. 36 CFR 261.55©. Consult specific trail information at http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/mbs/conditions/?cid=STELPRDB5126323


Learn more about why regulations may be necessary in wilderness.

Fees

The following user fee system(s) have been implemented for this wilderness: TRAILHEAD PARKING. Fees are most often used to offset the operating costs of a permit system or to help fund management activities such as trail maintenance. Contact the Forest Service office or visit the websites listed for more specific information on this fee system.



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