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Highland Ridge Wilderness

General Location Maps Contacts Area Management Wilderness Laws Trip Planning Images
A weathered pine tree, clinging to an exposed slope, contrasted against a background of pale blue sky.
Library image #1857: Bristlecone pine on limestone ridge

Introduction

The United States Congress designated the Highland Ridge Wilderness (map) in 2006 and it now has a total of 68,623 acres. All of this wilderness is located in Nevada and is managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

Description

The Highland Ridge Wilderness lies at the southern end of the Snake Range, adjacent to Great Basin National Park. This area encompasses varying terrain, from sagebrush covered foothills to steep ridges with sheer rock outcrops. The steep, upland mountains are dotted with pinyon pine and juniper trees or higher up with limber and bristlecone pine. Several riparian corridors stretch through the area, lined with aspen, chokecherry, and currant. Wildflowers bloom during spring with paintbrush and blue flax being the most numerous. Mule deer elk and pronghorn antelope are common throughout the area. The rocky ledges and steep, forested mountains provide great habitat for stalking cougars.

Maps: USGS 7.5 Quadrangle Maps: Wheeler Peak, Minerva Canyon, Arch Canyon, Red Ledges, Big Springs, Needle Point Spring; USGS 1:100,000 Map: Garrison

Planning to Visit the Highland Ridge Wilderness?

Leave No Trace

How to follow the seven standard Leave No Trace principles differs in different parts of the country (desert vs. Rocky Mountains). Click on any of the principles listed below to learn more about how they apply in the Highland Ridge Wilderness.
  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
  3. Dispose of Waste Properly
  4. Leave What You Find
  5. Minimize Campfire Impacts
  6. Respect Wildlife
  7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors
For more information on Leave No Trace, Visit the Leave No Trace, Inc. website.