Are you using a screen reader? Click here to view the navigation links for this site as a bulleted list.



Partner logos: BLM, FWS, FS, NPS, University of Montana Wilderness.net Logo
Connecting federal employees, scientists, educators, and the public with their wilderness heritage
Text size: A | A | A  [Print]

Delirium Wilderness

General Contacts Area Management Wilderness Laws

Introduction

The United States Congress designated the Delirium Wilderness (map) in 1987 and it now has a total of 11,952 acres. All of this wilderness is located in Michigan and is managed by the Forest Service.

Description

A few intrepid deer hunters in fall and skiers in winter are just about the only people who visit this Wilderness. A thickly forested swamp with surface water and biting insects, it bears signs of past human influence, such as old logging roads and saw-razed stumps from strip cutting of cedar trees. Swamp conifers, aspens, and white cedars have returned to the region, with red and jack pines standing in its drier areas. Flat to gently rolling, Delirium Wilderness was smoothed by glaciers, which carved six-acre Delirium Pond. Only 300 feet of elevation separate the area's high point from the low point.

The headwaters of the Pine and Waiska Rivers are in the swamp, providing habitat for waterfowl (ducks, loons, herons, and cranes) and small fur-bearing species. Black bears commonly roam the area and rabbits hop through here. There are no established trails, so making your way through these northern wetlands can be physically uncomfortable.

Planning to Visit the Delirium Wilderness?

Leave No Trace

How to follow the seven standard Leave No Trace principles differs in different parts of the country (desert vs. Rocky Mountains). Click on any of the principles listed below to learn more about how they apply in the Delirium Wilderness.
  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
  3. Dispose of Waste Properly
  4. Leave What You Find
  5. Minimize Campfire Impacts
  6. Respect Wildlife
  7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors
For more information on Leave No Trace, Visit the Leave No Trace, Inc. website.



Give us your feedback