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Mount Nutt Wilderness

General Area Management Wilderness Laws

Introduction

The United States Congress designated the Mount Nutt Wilderness (map) in 1990 and it now has a total of 28,080 acres. All of this wilderness is located in Arizona and is managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

Description

At 5,216 feet, Mount Nutt presides over a colorful and wild terrain encompassing eight miles of the central and highest portion of the Black Mountains. Along the main ridgeline you'll find prominent mesas that have been cut into a series of steep canyon mazes. The outlying area is ringed by volcanic plugs.

More than 100 desert bighorn sheep are known to make their home in the Wilderness. Numerous springs in the area sustain small oases of large cottonwoods, willows, and oaks. A parcel of privately held land exists in the western portion. Human visitors come to backpack, hunt, scramble on the rocks, and take photographs in the morning and evening when the sun casts a delightful glow on the carved volcanic landforms.

Planning to Visit the Mount Nutt Wilderness?

Leave No Trace

How to follow the seven standard Leave No Trace principles differs in different parts of the country (desert vs. Rocky Mountains). Click on any of the principles listed below to learn more about how they apply in the Mount Nutt Wilderness.
  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
  3. Dispose of Waste Properly
  4. Leave What You Find
  5. Minimize Campfire Impacts
  6. Respect Wildlife
  7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors
For more information on Leave No Trace, Visit the Leave No Trace, Inc. website.



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