Are you using a screen reader? Click here to view the navigation links for this site as a bulleted list.



Partner logos: BLM, FWS, FS, NPS, University of Montana Wilderness.net Logo
Connecting federal employees, scientists, educators, and the public with their wilderness heritage
Text size: A | A | A  [Print]

Rocks and Islands Wilderness

General Contacts Area Management Wilderness Laws Trip Planning

Introduction

The United States Congress designated the Rocks and Islands Wilderness (map) in 2006 and it now has a total of 6 acres. All of this wilderness is located in California and is managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

Description

The California coastal Rocks and Islands Wilderness protects critical components of a unique area of California coastline. Although one of the smallest wildernesses in the system at 5.89 acres, it encompasses 584 rocks, islands, exposed reefs, and pinnacles spread out over miles along a section of California's northern coast, now protected as the King Range Wilderness. The largest rock is .58 acres while the smallest rocks are less than 1 sq. ft. in size. These various rocks and islands are home to a diverse ecosystem of birds and sea mammals. The coastal rocks and islands comprise a narrow flight lane in the Pacific flyway, providing protected nest sites as well as feeding and perching areas for millions of seabirds. This unique ecosystem is also important for the continued survival of endangered or threatened sea mammals, such as Steller sea lions and elephant seals.

Planning to Visit the Rocks and Islands Wilderness?

Leave No Trace

How to follow the seven standard Leave No Trace principles differs in different parts of the country (desert vs. Rocky Mountains). Click on any of the principles listed below to learn more about how they apply in the Rocks and Islands Wilderness.
  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
  3. Dispose of Waste Properly
  4. Leave What You Find
  5. Minimize Campfire Impacts
  6. Respect Wildlife
  7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors
For more information on Leave No Trace, Visit the Leave No Trace, Inc. website.



Give us your feedback