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Opal Creek Wilderness

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Introduction

The United States Congress designated the Opal Creek Wilderness (map) in 1996 and it now has a total of 20,746 acres. All of this wilderness is located in Oregon and is managed by the Forest Service. The Opal Creek Wilderness is bordered by the Bull of the Woods Wilderness to the east.

Description

Opal Creek Wilderness features steep and rugged forested hillsides. The eastern portion of the area encompasses the headwaters of two major creeks (Battle Axe Creek and Opal Creek) which join to become the Little North Santiam River. The western portion of the area is dominated by two prominent peaks; Whetstone and Henline Mountains, which offer scenic vantage points and were once used as fire lookout sites. Opal Creek Wilderness can be reached via Oregon State Highway 22 and Marion County North Fork Road. The county road becomes Forest Road 2209 at the forest boundary. This road parallels the boundary of the western portion of the wilderness. Three trailheads, Henline Falls-Ogle Mountain, Henline Mountain and Nasty Rock trails are along the road. The eastern or "interior" portion of the wilderness is reached from the gated end of road 2209. Public vehicle traffic is not permitted beyond the gate but foot, and horse travel is allowed. This former mining access route continues to parallel the wilderness boundary and trailheads for Whetstone Mountain, Mike Kopetski-Opal Creek and Battle Axe Creek trails are located along the route. (Bicycles are allowed on the road beyond the gate into Jawbone Flats but are prohibited on trails off of the road.)

Planning to Visit the Opal Creek Wilderness?

Leave No Trace

How to follow the seven standard Leave No Trace principles differs in different parts of the country (desert vs. Rocky Mountains). Click on any of the principles listed below to learn more about how they apply in the Opal Creek Wilderness.
  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
  3. Dispose of Waste Properly
  4. Leave What You Find
  5. Minimize Campfire Impacts
  6. Respect Wildlife
  7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors
For more information on Leave No Trace, Visit the Leave No Trace, Inc. website.



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